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Transgenic mouse models are extensively used in neuroscience for various purposes, including the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cell-specific neuronal manipulation studies using Cre-expressing mouse lines.


In the context of Alzheimer's disease, transgenic mouse models have been invaluable in advancing our understanding of this complex neurodegenerative disorder. These models often incorporate genetic mutations associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's, such as those affecting the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and other related proteins. The presence of extracellular amyloid-β plaques and intraneuronal tau neurofibrillary tangles in the cerebral cortex, characteristic of AD, are replicated in these models to various extents. While no single model perfectly recapitulates both the pathological aspects and behavioral phenotypes of AD, these models have been instrumental in exploring disease mechanisms and evaluating potential treatments. However, it's important to note the challenges in translating findings from these models to human pathology, particularly given the complex etiology of Alzheimer's disease and recent clinical trial failures.


In addition to Alzheimer's research, Cre-expressing mouse lines are widely used for cell type-specific studies in neuroscience. This approach allows for the selective expression or deletion of genes in specific neuron types, enabling researchers to dissect the roles of these genes in various neural processes and behaviors. The Cre-loxP system is a cornerstone of this approach, offering precise control over gene expression in specific cell types. This method is particularly useful in studies where understanding the role of specific neuronal populations is crucial, such as in the context of neurological disorders or understanding the neural circuits underlying behavior.

Overall, transgenic mouse models, including those using Cre-expressing lines, have significantly contributed to the advancement of neuroscience, providing insights into complex neurological diseases and enabling targeted investigations into the functions of specific neuronal populations.

Description

Technique

Transgenic Mouse Models

Mark-Brandon-lab-LifeStyle-web-color--201.jpg

Grid cell disruption in a mouse model of early Alzheimer’s disease reflects reduced integration of self-motion cues

Disruption of the grid cell network in a mouse model of early Alzheimer’s disease

DG–CA3 circuitry mediates hippocampal representations of latent information

Hippocampal Neural Circuits Respond to Optogenetic Pacing of Theta Frequencies by Generating Accelerated Oscillation Frequencies

Transgenic Mouse Models is used in these papers

Transgenic mouse models are extensively used in neuroscience for various purposes, including the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cell-specific neuronal manipulation studies using Cre-expressing mouse lines.


In the context of Alzheimer's disease, transgenic mouse models have been invaluable in advancing our understanding of this complex neurodegenerative disorder. These models often incorporate genetic mutations associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's, such as those affecting the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and other related proteins. The presence of extracellular amyloid-β plaques and intraneuronal tau neurofibrillary tangles in the cerebral cortex, characteristic of AD, are replicated in these models to various extents. While no single model perfectly recapitulates both the pathological aspects and behavioral phenotypes of AD, these models have been instrumental in exploring disease mechanisms and evaluating potential treatments. However, it's important to note the challenges in translating findings from these models to human pathology, particularly given the complex etiology of Alzheimer's disease and recent clinical trial failures.


In addition to Alzheimer's research, Cre-expressing mouse lines are widely used for cell type-specific studies in neuroscience. This approach allows for the selective expression or deletion of genes in specific neuron types, enabling researchers to dissect the roles of these genes in various neural processes and behaviors. The Cre-loxP system is a cornerstone of this approach, offering precise control over gene expression in specific cell types. This method is particularly useful in studies where understanding the role of specific neuronal populations is crucial, such as in the context of neurological disorders or understanding the neural circuits underlying behavior.

Overall, transgenic mouse models, including those using Cre-expressing lines, have significantly contributed to the advancement of neuroscience, providing insights into complex neurological diseases and enabling targeted investigations into the functions of specific neuronal populations.

Description

Technique

Transgenic Mouse Models

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