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'In vivo electrophysiology' is a sophisticated technique used in neuroscience to study the electrical activities of neurons in freely behaving animals. This method involves the use of twisted microwires, known as tetrodes, which are adept at detecting action potentials from nearby neurons. By employing this technique, we can record both local field potentials and the spiking activity of neurons in real-time as the animals engage in their natural behaviors.


This approach is particularly valuable in understanding the dynamics of neural circuits during various behaviors and how these circuits are altered in pathological conditions. For instance, my lab's research on mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, in vivo electrophysiology is crucial. It allows for the monitoring of neuronal responses during different behaviors and observing how these responses change as the disease progresses. This provides invaluable insights into the neural mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease and contributes to the development of potential therapies.

Description

In Vivo Electrophysiology

Technique

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Grid cell disruption in a mouse model of early Alzheimer’s disease reflects reduced integration of self-motion cues

Disruption of the grid cell network in a mouse model of early Alzheimer’s disease

Hippocampal Neural Circuits Respond to Optogenetic Pacing of Theta Frequencies by Generating Accelerated Oscillation Frequencies

Multiple Running Speed Signals in Medial Entorhinal Cortex

During running in place, grid cells integrate elapsed time and distance run

The medial entorhinal cortex is necessary for temporal organization of hippocampal neuronal activity

New and Distinct Hippocampal Place Codes Are Generated in a New Environment during Septal Inactivation

Segregation of cortical head direction cell assemblies on alternating theta cycles

Reduction of Theta Rhythm Dissociates Grid Cell Spatial Periodicity from Directional Tuning

Head Direction Cells in the Postsubiculum Do Not Show Replay of Prior Waking Sequences During Sleep

Decoding Movement Trajectories Through a T-Maze Using Point Process Filters Applied to Place Field Data from Rat Hippocampal Region CA1

In Vivo Electrophysiology is used in these papers

'In vivo electrophysiology' is a sophisticated technique used in neuroscience to study the electrical activities of neurons in freely behaving animals. This method involves the use of twisted microwires, known as tetrodes, which are adept at detecting action potentials from nearby neurons. By employing this technique, we can record both local field potentials and the spiking activity of neurons in real-time as the animals engage in their natural behaviors.


This approach is particularly valuable in understanding the dynamics of neural circuits during various behaviors and how these circuits are altered in pathological conditions. For instance, my lab's research on mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, in vivo electrophysiology is crucial. It allows for the monitoring of neuronal responses during different behaviors and observing how these responses change as the disease progresses. This provides invaluable insights into the neural mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease and contributes to the development of potential therapies.

Description

In Vivo Electrophysiology

Technique

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